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Dupa 1 mai 2008 reguli noi pentru statele noi membre in UE (inclusiv Romania)

http://www.nyidanmark.dk/en-us/coming_to_dk/eu_and_nordic_citizens/citiz...

Last update: 5/1/2008
Published by: The Danish Immigration Service

Citizens of the new EU countries
EU citizens can enter and reside in Denmark in accordance with the EU regulations on free movement of persons and services.

The EU has increased its number of member states by 12 since 2004. Citizens of 10 of these countries - Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia - are subject to transitional rules when seeking to work in Denmark.

Please note:
The transitional rules only apply to citizens of the new EU countries working in Denmark.
The rules were most recently changed on 1 May 2008.
In all other respects, citizens of the new EU countries fall under the same rules as other EU citizens. This means that they can enter and reside in Denmark for up to six months if they are seeking employment. They must be able to support themselves for the duration of their stay, and they will lose the right to stay in Denmark if they apply for public assistance.
Special rules apply if you are stationed in Denmark by a company from another EU/EEA country. In this case, you may not need a residence and work permit.
Transitional rules for employees from the ten new EU countries - effective 1 May 2008
If your position is covered by a collective bargaining agreement, you do not need to apply for a residence and work permit. Instead, the regular EU regulations apply, and you must apply for an EU residence certificate. If you are living in Denmark, you can apply for an EU residence certificate (application form OD1) at the Regional State Administration. You cannot submit your application to the Immigration Service.

If you are living abroad, you can submit your application to a Danish diplomatic mission in your country of origin (or in the country where you have resided permanently for the past three months).

Make sure to include all necessary documentation in your application as this will minimise processing time. The Regional State Administration can provide you with a list of the required documents as well as information on expected processing times.

Please note:
You do not need to inform the Immigration Service that you have been hired to work in Denmark, but you must apply for a residence certificate from the Regional State Administration.
You are not required to work a minimum of 30 hours per week.
The pre-approval procedure for positions covered by collective bargaining agreements is eliminated.
As soon as you begin working, your employer must give you written documentation for your employment which must indicate which collective bargaining agreement the position is covered by.
If you are a researcher, educator, key worker or specialist or work in another position normally hired on an individual employment contract, you do not need to apply for a residence and work permit if your employer in Denmark is a party to a collective bargaining agreement. Instead, you must apply for a residence certificate from the Regional State Administration. In addition, your employer must declare that you meet all the requirements to qualify for the regular EU regulations, including that you are employed as a researcher, educator, key employee or specialist.
If your position is not covered by a collective bargaining agreement, the current transitional rules apply:
You must apply for a residence and work permit from the Immigration Service. You may not begin working until you have received your permit.
You must work at least 30 hours per week, and your salary and employment conditions must correspond to Danish standards.
Your employer must be permitted to withhold taxes in accordance with the Tax at Source Act, and may not be involved in a strike, lockout or blockade.
You must have an offer of employment for a specific position, or you must have signed an employment contract with your employer.
If you are a researcher, educator, key worker or specialist who normally has an individual employment contract, you must apply for a residence and work permit if your employer is not a party to a collective bargaining agreement.
The Immigration Service may need to obtain a statement from the regional employment council in order to process your case.

Your residence and work permit is issued on the grounds of the specific job you have been offered. If you change job, you must also apply for a new permit, even if the new job is with the same employer.

Normally, your residence and work permit will be revoked if you lose or leave your job.
How to apply
If you are required to hold a residence and work permit, you must apply to the Immigration Service.

When applying for a residence and work permit, both you and your employer must supply the Immigration Service with relevant information.

The application form contains a detailed description of how you and your employer in Denmark should complete the form, and which documents you must attach.

Please note that your employer in Denmark must complete and sign his/her part of the form before sending it to you. When you have completed and signed your part of the form, you can submit your application along with the necessary documents.

EU citizens under the transitional rules
> AR6 (Danish and English version)

Your employer can also obtain a printed version from the Service Centre of the Immigration Service or the local police.
Where to submit your application
If you are living in Denmark, you can submit your application to the Service Centre of the Immigration Service or to the local police. You can also send your application to the Immigration Service by post.

If you are living abroad, you can submit your application to a Danish diplomatic mission in your country of origin (or in the country where you have resided permanently for the past three months).

Make sure to include all necessary documentation in your application as this will minimise processing time.
How long are residence permits granted for?
Residence and work permits are normally granted for a maximum of one year at a time, with a possibility for extension. However, a permit is never granted for longer than the period specified in your employment contract.

Researchers, teachers, administrators in managerial positions and specialists are eligible for residence and work permits valid for up to three years, with the possibility of extension for up to four years at a time.

Your residence card will be issued and sent to you when you register with your local branch of the Central Office of Civil Registration (Folkeregistret).
Extension
If your present residence and work permit is about to expire, you can apply for an extension by using the application form mentioned above (AR6).

If your original job contract is temporary and is about to expire, and you wish to continue with the same employer, your application must include a copy of your new job contract.

If your original job contract is not time-limited, you do not need to submit a new contract. Instead, you need to submit a statement from your employer confirming that until now, you have worked, and will continue to work, in his/her company.

If you wish to start working for a new employer, your application must include a copy of an offer or contract for a specific position from your employer. Furthermore, your new employer needs to submit an information form.

During the processing of your case, you are allowed to continue working for the same employer, even if your residence and work permit has expired.

If you wish to start working for a new employer, you must apply for a new residence and work permit by using the application form mentioned above (AR6).
After 12 monts' employment
If you can document 12 months of uninterrupted employment in Denmark, you are entitled to the same rights and privileges as other EU citizens (citizens of the 'old' EU countries).

This means that you can change employer without having to apply for a new residence and work permit. It also means that you will be issued a proof of registration.

If, after 12 monts' uninterrupted employment, you apply for an extension in order to start working for a new employer, you must present the Immigration Service with documentation such as your payslips for the entire 12 months, or a statement from your employer confirming 12 months' uninterrupted employment.

You will then receive a proof of registration in the form of a letter from the Immigration Service, confirming your rights as an EU citizen. The proof of registration does not expire.

Your proof of registration is contingent upon your being employed. If you lose or leave your job, you will normally lose the right to reside in Denmark. However, you may still be allowed to stay in Denmark, if you:
are temporarily unable to work due to illness or an accident
have lost your job through no fault of your own, and are registered with your local job centre and actively seeking employment
have started on vocational training in connection with your job
have lost your job through no fault of your own, and have started on vocational training of any type
After having resided continuously in Denmark for five years, you are entitled to permanent residency.
Bringing your family
If you come to Denmark to work, you may also bring your family members. Each of your family members must be able to document their relation to you, e.g. with a marriage licence or birth certificate.

Your family members can apply for a proof of registration (if they are EU/EEA citizens) or a proof of residence (if they are third-country citizens). Your family members must hold a valid visa if they are citizens of a country with a visa requirement for Denmark.

You can apply on behalf of your family members in your own application for a work permit, or your family members can apply at the Danish diplomatic mission in their country, at a police station in Denmark, or directly to the Immigration Service.

If your family members' application for family reunification is rejected by the Immigration Service, they can appeal the case to the Ministry of Refugee, Immigration and Integration Affairs.
The transitional scheme applies only to employees
As a citizen of one of the ten new EU countries, you are allowed to study or work as a self-employed person in Denmark on equal footing with all other EU citizens. In both cases, you must apply for a proof of registration at the Regional State Administration.

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aici gasesti tot ce iti

aici gasesti tot ce iti trebuie buna treaba , felicitarii